Sonic Liturgy: Ritual and Music in Hindu Tradition (Studies in Comparative Religion)

Yogic Traditions and Sacred Sound Practices in the United States
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Regarding the second component, the study of musical instruments, Dr.

Sonic Liturgy: Ritual and Music in Hindu Tradition (Studies in Comparative Religion)

Helene La Rue, Curator of the Pitt Rivers Museum and the Bate Collection of Historical Instruments, guided me through all of the collections and allowed me to photograph each item that was requested. Tagore was the most important Indian benefactor of musical instruments, and donated hundreds of rare and precious Indian instruments to many European museums in the 19th Century including the state collections at Brussels and Berlin.

Many of the items donated by Tagore to Oxford are presently in storage, but I was able to view and photograph them with the help of Dr. La Rue. Each of the exhibits here as well as at the Bate Collection, founded in at the Faculty of Music Oxford with instruments, was photographed and documented.

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The third component was fulfilled by consultation with the above-mentioned faculty and research assistants at Oxford and in London. Opportunities for feedback on the research was provided during teaching work that was also performed while at Oxford. These lectures were given on consecutive Thursday evenings, from October 11 through November 29, and were very well-attended.

This teaching experience for OCVHS was thoroughly compatible with my research in that the faculty members assisting me in my research also attended my lectures and were able to offer valuable feedback and advice regarding the direction of my interests. This consisted of a series of eight seminars on successive Wednesday evenings from October 10 through November 28 at the Pitt Rivers Research Centre, directed toward graduate students in World Music studies. This was especially valuable in that many of the insights discovered during the course of my research were also tested in this venue on both graduate students and music faculty.

Graham Wells, President of the Galpin Society of Musical Instruments, also attended my lectures and seminars and provided valuable feedback and interaction. Richard Widdess, Chair of Music. This research project was designed to break new ground in the fields of comparative musicology and religion by increasing the general awareness of the major contribution of Indic traditions toward world religious chant and music.

As it happened, I was able to collect a large amount of data supporting the premises of the original research proposal. As this data is placed under the lens of comparative music history, the results become nuanced in terms of migrations of population, hegemonic control of Indic cultures by foreign powers, syncretism arising from the combination of musical genres and techniques, and evolutionary development of musical styles and the structures of musical instruments. Some general summations, however, are possible at this stage.

Religious chant and vocal intonation are convincingly the central core of religious experience worldwide.

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As he maps the evolution of sonic liturgy in Hindu culture, Beck shows how, parallel to the development of religious ritual from ancient times to the present, there is a less understood progression of musical form, beginning with Vedic chants of two to three notes to complicated genres of devotional temple music employing ragas with up to a dozen notes. View all copies of this ISBN edition:. The word comes from Dhruva which means immovable and permanent. It happens, just reset it in a minute. Search within my subject: Select Tansen's style and innovations inspired many, and many modern gharanas Hindustani music teaching houses link themselves to his lineage. Music is essential to Hindu mythology, where divine beings perform and instruct humans in the gentle art that facilitates both enjoyment bhukti and liberation mukti.

This fact is not solely the result of independent arising in different regions of the world but owes as much to Indic or Asiatic influences that have been disseminated over thousands of years. This Zoroastrian base, which is cognate with Vedic chant traditions, is also seminal in the oldest levels of Hebrew cantillation and Jewish prayer, reaching Christian chant and Psalmody through the overlapping of liturgical traditions.

Another example is that of the Theravada Buddhist chanting of the Pali Canon, based on Vedic models, which has spread all over South East Asia and, through its Mahayana counterpart, influenced countless types of religious chant and rituals in Central Asia, China, Korea, and Japan. While this fourfold structural division itself is traced to the Natya-Sastra of Muni Bharata in India before BCE , major archetypes and structural innovations within each category can be successfully traced to Indo-Persian or Asiatic origin.

While many ideas and dimensions of Indic influences had been earlier suggested and even discussed at certain junctures in European music historiography viz. Furthermore, most Music Departments on the college level do not offer courses on World Music, Ethnomusicology, or Comparative Musicology, what to speak of secondary schools.

source Instruments and songs were also required in the mystery cults of Cybele and lsis. At a more profound level music as cultic action was understood to exercise a magical influence over the gods, so that it became a means by which men controlled the deities. For example, the worshippers of lsis made a din with their bells during the liturgy so as to keep the wicked Set away from the sacred action. This kind of action has strong parallels with ancient Indian music and its control over the Devas. This sacred dimension is called the Celtic Otherworld, in which music is often prominently featured.

It seems as though many of these experiences are of a non-verbal nature, and that music can serve as an important communicative or expressive medium…. By a careful examination of the sources, it appears that the early Celts believed that music can give access to reality in both every day, mundane and otherworldly contexts. Musicologists and ethnomusicologists agree that music is a universal aspect of culture that is also central to religion in various ways. From the side of ethnomusicology, Bruno Nettl has strongly affirmed the ubiquitous connection between religion and music in his textbook Excursions in World Music : "In all societies, music is found in religious ritual- it is almost everywhere a mainstay of sacred ceremonies-leading some scholars to suggest that perhaps music was actually invented for humans to have a special way of communicating with the supernatural.

The complex interlacing of music and religion is articulated further by musicologist Robin Sylvan in Traces of the Spirit: The Religious Dimensions of Popular Music : "Music is capable of functioning simultaneously at many different levels physiological, psychological, socio-cultural, semiological, virtual, ritual, and spiritual and integrating them into a coherent whole.

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So for a complex multi- dimensional phenomenon like religion, which also functions simultaneously at multiple levels, the fact that music is capable of conveying all these levels of complexity in a compelling and integrated package makes it a vehicle par excellence to carry the religious impulse. RITUAL STUDIES The quest to understand the seemingly intrinsic connection between religious ritual and music takes us to the discipline of ritual studies, where the arguments for the special significance of ritual are the most pronounced and a basis is provided for a broad definition of ritual that fills our expectations with regard to the presence of music.

Ritual studies serves to underscore the central importance of ritual for religion and, in many cases, for all human existence. Anthropologist Mary Douglas has stated it succinctly: "As a social animal, man is a ritual animal. If ritual is suppressed in one form it crops up in others, more strongly and more intense the social interaction. Mitchell, in his book Liturgy and the Social Sciences , holds that "what is at stake in ritual behavior-as it develops in individuals and is ritually enacted by groups- is nothing less than the survival of the social order; Verify the characters on the left.

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Please note that your card will be active in the system for 30 days. Viewed times since 1st Oct, About The Author Beck shows how, parallel to the development of religious ritual from ancient times to the present, there is a less understood progression of musical form, beginning with Vedic chants of two to three notes to complicated genres of devotional temple music employing ragas with up to a dozen notes. Preface This book is dedicated to all the musicians and ritual specialists of Hindu India who have diligently maintained their traditions with unswerving devotion over the centuries.

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Hinduism in brief

Preview — Sonic Theology by Guy L. Traditionally Hinduism has appealed to Western eyes though its rich tableau of visual artifacts: temple architecture, sculpture, painting, craft. Guy Beck argues, however, that the focus of Western scholars on Hinduism's visual component has often been at the expense of the religion's most important feature - its emphasis on sound.

Beck addresses this longstanding imbalanc Traditionally Hinduism has appealed to Western eyes though its rich tableau of visual artifacts: temple architecture, sculpture, painting, craft. Beck addresses this longstanding imbalance in this pathbreaking study. He contends that sound possesses a central place in Hindu theory and practice and that Hinduism is essentially a sonic theology. Unlike religious traditions that emphasize silence, the Hindu world is permeated by sound. Drums, bells, gongs, cymbals, conches, flutes, and an array of vocalizations play a central role in the worship experience.

As he weaves the theology of sound throughout Hindu textual traditions, Beck provides ample, coherent justifications of the practical use of sound in Mantra repetitions, Om recitations, and Nada-Brahman meditational techniques.

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Sonic Liturgy: Ritual and Music in Hindu Tradition builds on the foundation of Sonic Theology: Hinduism and Sacred Sound (Studies in Comparative Religion). Compre Sonic Liturgy: Ritual and Music in Hindu Tradition (Studies in Comparative Religion) (English Edition) de Guy L. Beck na simprocktustemp.tk Confira.

He compares the centrality of sound in Hindu theology to its role, or its absence, in other religions. The issues Beck raises about sound and language not only reshape our understanding of Hindu worship but also invite a fresh approach to comparative theology. Get A Copy. Hardcover , pages. More Details Original Title. Other Editions 2. Friend Reviews. To see what your friends thought of this book, please sign up.

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